A 25 year old Master of Ancient Classics, just blogging and reblogging his love of the Greek and Roman civilisations.

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Detail from the Metopes of the Parthenon.

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Detail from the Metopes of the Parthenon.

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Statue from the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus.

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Statue from the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus.

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Statue from the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus.

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Statue from the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus.

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Statue from the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus.

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Statue from the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus.

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Hestia, Dione and Aphrodite, from Parthenon east pediment.

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Hestia, Dione and Aphrodite, from Parthenon east pediment.

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Metope from the Parthenon.

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Metope from the Parthenon.

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Metopes from the Parthenon.

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Metopes from the Parthenon.

"Dionysus is a god who takes human form, a powerful male who looks soft and feminine, a native of Thebes who dresses as a foreigner. His parentage is mixed between divine and human; he is and is not a citizen of Thebes; his power has both feminine and masculine aspects. He does not merely cross boundaries, he blurs and confounds them, makes nonsense of the lines between Greek and foreign, between female and male, between powerful and weak, between savage and civilized. He is the god of both tragedy and comedy, and in his presence the distinction between them falls away, as both comedy and tragedy…"

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Paul Woodruff, 

The Bacchae (Translated and Annotated) - Euripides

(via contradictionaddiction)

(via records-of-fortune)

Arch of Constantine details

(Source: ifyoudontbreatheout, via didoofcarthage)

visitheworld:

Tetrapylon gate in the ancient ruined city of Aphrodisias, Turkey (by colinmillerphoto).

visitheworld:

Tetrapylon gate in the ancient ruined city of Aphrodisias, Turkey (by colinmillerphoto).

(via theancientworld)