A 25 year old Master of Ancient Classics, just blogging and reblogging his love of the Greek and Roman civilisations.

Posts:

archaicwonder:

A prophetic and uncanny coin of Brutus
A Roman silver denarius of Q. Servilius Caepio Brutus (Marcus Junius Brutus), struck in 54 BC at Rome. The coin shows Brutus on the front with the reverse showing the profile of Gaius Servilius Structus Ahala, a 5th century BC politician of ancient Rome.
Ahala was Brutus’ ancestor and considered by many later writers such as Cicero to have been a hero. His fame rested on the contention that he saved Rome from Spurius Maelius in 439 BC by killing him with a dagger concealed under his armpit. Maelius, a wealthy Roman plebeian, was slain because he was suspected of plotting to make himself king. The presence on this coin of Brutus’ infamous ancestor is quite eerie, given that 10 years later, Brutus himself would become the ringleader in the assassination plot against Julius Caesar.

archaicwonder:

A prophetic and uncanny coin of Brutus

A Roman silver denarius of Q. Servilius Caepio Brutus (Marcus Junius Brutus), struck in 54 BC at Rome. The coin shows Brutus on the front with the reverse showing the profile of Gaius Servilius Structus Ahala, a 5th century BC politician of ancient Rome.

Ahala was Brutus’ ancestor and considered by many later writers such as Cicero to have been a hero. His fame rested on the contention that he saved Rome from Spurius Maelius in 439 BC by killing him with a dagger concealed under his armpit. Maelius, a wealthy Roman plebeian, was slain because he was suspected of plotting to make himself king. The presence on this coin of Brutus’ infamous ancestor is quite eerie, given that 10 years later, Brutus himself would become the ringleader in the assassination plot against Julius Caesar.

(Source: numisbids.com)

qualityisahabit:

Labours of Heracles, the Capture of Cerberus

qualityisahabit:

Labours of Heracles, the Capture of Cerberus

archaicwonder:

Delos, Greece
In ancient Greek mythology, Delos was said to be the birthplace of Apollo, the son of Zeus. The Mycenaeans were the first to recognize the island as a holy place but the major development of the island began when the Ionians came in 1100 BC. They gained political and spiritual status for Delos by building elaborate temples to Apollo and other gods. As populations grew throughout the whole eastern Mediterranean, commercial trade also increased. By the end of the 4th century BC the Macedonians were in control and because of Delos’ central location they turned it into an important trade center. The Romans followed suit and it was during their reign that the population grew, made up not only of Greeks and Italians but also Phoenicians, Syrians, Egyptians, Palestinians and Jews. Delos is a small island, which covers an area of approximately 5 square kilometers. At this time in history it was estimated to have had a population of 25,000 people.
The decline of Delos happened gradually during the 1st centuries BC/AD as Rome began to concentrate its attention on Rhodes as its eastern commercial port. Much of the devastation of Delos occured during the Ottoman Empire. Delos’ marble was reused as building material and the bronze cramps that held the ancient buildings together were removed and recycled for other purposes, leaving Delos in ruins.
The island of Delos is near Mykonos, near the center of the Cyclades archipelago, Greece.
(note: Click on the source to view large, it’s worth it!)

archaicwonder:

Delos, Greece

In ancient Greek mythology, Delos was said to be the birthplace of Apollo, the son of Zeus. The Mycenaeans were the first to recognize the island as a holy place but the major development of the island began when the Ionians came in 1100 BC. They gained political and spiritual status for Delos by building elaborate temples to Apollo and other gods. As populations grew throughout the whole eastern Mediterranean, commercial trade also increased. By the end of the 4th century BC the Macedonians were in control and because of Delos’ central location they turned it into an important trade center. The Romans followed suit and it was during their reign that the population grew, made up not only of Greeks and Italians but also Phoenicians, Syrians, Egyptians, Palestinians and Jews. Delos is a small island, which covers an area of approximately 5 square kilometers. At this time in history it was estimated to have had a population of 25,000 people.

The decline of Delos happened gradually during the 1st centuries BC/AD as Rome began to concentrate its attention on Rhodes as its eastern commercial port. Much of the devastation of Delos occured during the Ottoman Empire. Delos’ marble was reused as building material and the bronze cramps that held the ancient buildings together were removed and recycled for other purposes, leaving Delos in ruins.

The island of Delos is near Mykonos, near the center of the Cyclades archipelago, Greece.

(note: Click on the source to view large, it’s worth it!)

(Source: domus-aurea2)

ancientpeoples:

Statue of a draped woman
She wears a flimsy chiton over which a himation is draped. The folds of the under garment are carefully conceived. The arms and head were separately made and are now missing. A piece of drapery was separately made at the rear showing the overfall of the himation.
2nd Century BC
Hellenistic
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Statue of a draped woman

She wears a flimsy chiton over which a himation is draped. The folds of the under garment are carefully conceived. The arms and head were separately made and are now missing. A piece of drapery was separately made at the rear showing the overfall of the himation.

2nd Century BC

Hellenistic

(Source: The British Museum)

mostlyitaly:



Segesta, Sicily by James Appleton
thegetty:

Quite the amethyst impression.
Engraved Portrait of Aurelian, A.D. 260-280, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

thegetty:

Quite the amethyst impression.

Engraved Portrait of Aurelian, A.D. 260-280, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

(via byronofrochdale)

theholypopefish:

beware the ides of march

theholypopefish:

beware the ides of march

(via classicalcivilisation)

"Infamy, infamy - they've all got it in for me": The Ides of March ↘

hehasawifeyouknow:

In the course of writing a blog on all things ancient and historical the challenge is to try and keep things fresh. For the large part this is facilitated by choosing off-the-track subjects. Sometimes you are cornered by one which has seen a near infinite number of pieces written about it. Yes,…

honorthegods:

Mosaic of Minerva from Tusculum, 3rd century CE. The surrounding lunar phases were added at the time of installation in the Vatican Museum, 18th century.
The goddess is shown with the aegis, an abject which, according to Virgil “… Athene wears in her angry moods - a fearsome thing with a surface of gold like scaly snake-skin, and he linked serpents and the Gorgon herself upon the goddess’s breast—a severed head rolling its eyes.”

honorthegods:

Mosaic of Minerva from Tusculum, 3rd century CE. The surrounding lunar phases were added at the time of installation in the Vatican Museum, 18th century.

The goddess is shown with the aegis, an abject which, according to Virgil “… Athene wears in her angry moods - a fearsome thing with a surface of gold like scaly snake-skin, and he linked serpents and the Gorgon herself upon the goddess’s breast—a severed head rolling its eyes.”

(via byronofrochdale)