A 25 year old Master of Ancient Classics, just blogging and reblogging his love of the Greek and Roman civilisations.

Posts:

"Dionysus is a god who takes human form, a powerful male who looks soft and feminine, a native of Thebes who dresses as a foreigner. His parentage is mixed between divine and human; he is and is not a citizen of Thebes; his power has both feminine and masculine aspects. He does not merely cross boundaries, he blurs and confounds them, makes nonsense of the lines between Greek and foreign, between female and male, between powerful and weak, between savage and civilized. He is the god of both tragedy and comedy, and in his presence the distinction between them falls away, as both comedy and tragedy…"

-

Paul Woodruff, 

The Bacchae (Translated and Annotated) - Euripides

(via contradictionaddiction)

(via records-of-fortune)

Arch of Constantine details

(Source: ifyoudontbreatheout, via didoofcarthage)

visitheworld:

Tetrapylon gate in the ancient ruined city of Aphrodisias, Turkey (by colinmillerphoto).

visitheworld:

Tetrapylon gate in the ancient ruined city of Aphrodisias, Turkey (by colinmillerphoto).

(via theancientworld)

theancientworld:

Corinthian Helmet, Bronze, c. 510 BCE, The British Museum

Ancient Greek cuirass, Bronze c. 620-580 BCE, National Archeological Museum of Spain

Pair of greaves with a Gorgon’s head in relief on each knee, Bronze, made in Apulia, c. 550–500 BCE, The British Museum

Ancient Greek sling bullets with engravings. One side depicts a winged thunderbolt, and the other, the Greek inscription “take that” (ΔΕΞΑΙ) in high relief, Lead, 4th century BCE, The British Museum

(via classicsenthusiast)

ancientgreecebuildings:

thebacchant:

The temple of Apollo, located in Delphi, Greece. Delphi was originally home to Mother Earth, Gaea and guarded by the Python. Apollo slayed the Python and took over, making Delphi his sacred/ worship spot.
 The temple was primarily where (male) citizens would go to seek the Delphic Oracle, Pythia (priestess acting as a medium through whom advice or prophecy was sought from the gods in classical antiquity) to learn about their prophecy. Citizens never had direct contact with her; whatever the Pythia prophesied, a male priest would repeat back to the citizen asking.
 The Pythia had to be a female virgin and sat on a tripod over the Adyton, which is the crack in the Earth, where apparently the Python’s body was that was rotting, in which the Pythia would inhale the vapors from the earth to bring her into a “trance-like” state of being, where she would prophesize about the future of those who wanted answers. There is another theory that she may of chewed laurel leaves (which are poisonous) or she drank undiluted wine.

A great photo; Delphi is such a breathtaking place - no wonder that ancient Greeks regarded it sacred

ancientgreecebuildings:

thebacchant:

The temple of Apollo, located in Delphi, Greece. Delphi was originally home to Mother Earth, Gaea and guarded by the Python. Apollo slayed the Python and took over, making Delphi his sacred/ worship spot.


The temple was primarily where (male) citizens would go to seek the Delphic Oracle, Pythia (priestess acting as a medium through whom advice or prophecy was sought from the gods in classical antiquity) to learn about their prophecy. Citizens never had direct contact with her; whatever the Pythia prophesied, a male priest would repeat back to the citizen asking.


The Pythia had to be a female virgin and sat on a tripod over the Adyton, which is the crack in the Earth, where apparently the Python’s body was that was rotting, in which the Pythia would inhale the vapors from the earth to bring her into a “trance-like” state of being, where she would prophesize about the future of those who wanted answers. There is another theory that she may of chewed laurel leaves (which are poisonous) or she drank undiluted wine.

A great photo; Delphi is such a breathtaking place - no wonder that ancient Greeks regarded it sacred

ancientgreecebuildings:

Delphi valley, Athenian treasury (510 to 480 BCE) in the front
Weather was “a bit” sunnier when we visited the place :). Walking up the valley and seeing all the steep hills and great buildings must have been quite an experience.
October 2008

ancientgreecebuildings:

Delphi valley, Athenian treasury (510 to 480 BCE) in the front

Weather was “a bit” sunnier when we visited the place :). Walking up the valley and seeing all the steep hills and great buildings must have been quite an experience.

October 2008

historical-nonfiction:

Alcibiades (or Alkibiades) was a gifted, rich, handsome, and flamboyant Athenian statesman and general whose shifting of sides during the Peloponnesian War in the 400s BCE earned him a reputation for cunning and treachery. He was appointed general at the minimum age (30) and therefore had a seat on the ruling council of Athens, which he held for fifteen years. After some shenanigans and a likely conspiracy against him, Alcibiades was condemned to death in Athens and unsurprisingly fled to Sparta. Falling out of favor with their king, he switched alleigence to Persian Satrap Tissaphernes who happened to be allied with Sparta. Under guise of organizing a Athenian-Persian alliance, Alcibiades organized a coup in Athens. Democracy was replaced by an oligarchy of 400. Alcibiades returned to his former post of general, defeated the Persians and Spartans, and expanded the oligarchy to 5000. (Things went downhill from here. Athens started losing the Peloponnesian War, Alcibiades was blamed, not re-elected, and unofficially exiled. He was eventually murdered while taking refuge with a Persian satrap.)

historical-nonfiction:

Alcibiades (or Alkibiades) was a gifted, rich, handsome, and flamboyant Athenian statesman and general whose shifting of sides during the Peloponnesian War in the 400s BCE earned him a reputation for cunning and treachery. He was appointed general at the minimum age (30) and therefore had a seat on the ruling council of Athens, which he held for fifteen years. After some shenanigans and a likely conspiracy against him, Alcibiades was condemned to death in Athens and unsurprisingly fled to Sparta. Falling out of favor with their king, he switched alleigence to Persian Satrap Tissaphernes who happened to be allied with Sparta. Under guise of organizing a Athenian-Persian alliance, Alcibiades organized a coup in Athens. Democracy was replaced by an oligarchy of 400. Alcibiades returned to his former post of general, defeated the Persians and Spartans, and expanded the oligarchy to 5000. (Things went downhill from here. Athens started losing the Peloponnesian War, Alcibiades was blamed, not re-elected, and unofficially exiled. He was eventually murdered while taking refuge with a Persian satrap.)

(Source: ancient.eu.com, via classicsenthusiast)

fuckyeahrenaissanceart:



Nike of Samothrace (Winged Victory)





Lysippos 



Marble

c. 200 B.C.E.





Musée du Louvre , Paris, Ile-de-France, France

fuckyeahrenaissanceart:

Nike of Samothrace (Winged Victory)
Lysippos 
Marble
c. 200 B.C.E.
Musée du Louvre , Paris, Ile-de-France, France

(via didoofcarthage)

gotraveling:

The Amphitheater of El Djem, Tunisia ~ by Alban Jaillais
maurozag:

Lysíppides - Hoplitas, pintura em ânfora grega de ca. 530 a.c.

maurozag:

Lysíppides - Hoplitas, pintura em ânfora grega de ca. 530 a.c.

(via classicsenthusiast)